About your Search

20140226
20140306
Search Results 0 to 15 of about 16 (some duplicates have been removed)
by thend of the winter. >> they aren't a couple of college kids. dwight shank is 67. larry davis is 53. she is here by herself. it is kind of in the backwoods type of thing. so, you know, it is pretty important for us to get a good supply of wood here for her. >> i knew they were going to be mostly retired people. >> they are part of a village a new community that helps older people help each other, their village stretches through seven different towns in western new hampshire, all surrounding the manatanak mountain dwight shank mountain. >> i think it's as good as well get for now and should be okay. after a drecareer in boston, in this retired and on the land he loves has it gotten harder? >> yes. i used to downhill ski. >> what about the maintenance? >> that's a big part of living here. when you get up in the morning, you may have had a foot of snow, you have to clear the driveway being before. roof. >> he is physically able. because he is retired, he has the free time to help others. he knows not too long from now, he will be on the receiving end. >> it made sense to me in terms of som
and before the great recession. ali dug deeper into the report with larry icall the project director for pew's philadelphia program. listen. >> one of the fascinating things we found was in 1970, 44% of people we considered middle class did not have a high school degree because there were the blue collar jobs available. that's not the case now. you need a college degree or a lot of college education to be considered part of the middle class. it's true nationally and in philadelphia. >> i've been talking to people about this all day. they say, "tell me why? why did it happen? what happened to philadelphia? why was it hit harder to other cities that you looked at?" what is the april to that. >> it was certainly hit hard. whether it was harder than other cities is hard to say. philadelphia was a heavily manufacturing town. when those jobs disappeared it tack a hard hit and maybe a little longer than other cities figure out what the next step is. now it's dependent on education and the medical sector and that is working better for the city. >> is the geography of philadelphia - does it work a
to dig deeper in this report is larry eikle the director of the pew's philadelphia program. thank you for being with us. >> thank you for having yes. >> philadelphia is a beautiful place. i call it home. and it really was traditionally a proudly middle class place. people were really okay being middle class, and middle class in the 50's and 60's, and into the 70's in many classes could actually mean blue color. >> it absolutely could. one of the fascinating things we found was in 1970 44% of the people we considered middle class didn't even have a high school degree because there were those blue collar jobs available. that's not the case now. you need a college degree or a lot of college education to be part of the middle class. that's true nationally and it's certainly true in philadelphia. >> so when people say, i've been talking to people about this all day. tell me why philadelphia was hit harder than other cities that you've looked at, what is the answer to that? >> well, it was certainly hit hard. whether it was harder than other cities i think is hard to say, but philadelphia w
with larry the project director for pew's philadelphia program. listen. >> one of the fascinating things we found was that in 970, 44% of the people that we considered middle class didn't even have a high school degree. because there were those blue collar jobs available. obviously that's not the case now. you need a college degree or at least a lot of college education to be considered part of the middle class. and that's true nationally. it's certainly true in philadelphia. >> so when people say -- i have been talking to people about this all day. and they say, tell me why? why did it happen? what happened to philadelphia why was it hit harder than so many other cities that you looked at? what's the answer to that? >> well, i mean, it was certainly hit hard whether it was harder than other cities is hard to say think philadelphia was a heavily manufacturing town. and when those jobs disappeared, it took a hard hit, and it may be took a little longer than some other cities to figure out what the next step was. now, you know, it's a heavily dependent on education and the medical sector and
-launcher on steroids. >> you launch things straight at walls, right? >> that's right, yes. >> dr. larry kane. >> pictures of damage after the tornado is all about impact. >> where wind really becomes an issue is the debris opens up the building envelope, the walls, the roof. once you have that envelope opened, now you've got double the trouble. the most predominant projectile that we see in these storms is normally something like a two by four. >> so what you tend to see coming out of this cannon is what you tend to see flying around when a tornado is centered? >> absolutely. we do tornado research for the national science foundation back in may after the moore tornado. specifically just to look for shelters in the storm path. >> the question now is: not whether to rebuild, but how. >> we're smart engineers. we know how to design for the wind speeds. and now, we know how to design for impact resistance. >> research performed tests on a variety of building materials. some of them failed. through trial and error, oinvocation came in the form of reinforcement and engineering. >> should we -- l
let's turn to cornell university's larry brown, a ye owe physics professor chair of the earth and atmospheric department. dr. brown, thanks so much for joining us. is man to blame or is nature? what's your cake on this in. >> both, probably. i think we have the three suspects that you mentioned. a possible natural up tick, although that's a little bit unusual, quite unusual. suspects in the man-made category, include both hydro fracturing and the wais wastewar disposal. most suggest that hydro fracturing is not the cause, but it's been known for a long time pumping large amounts of water can trigger earthquakes. >> i know this is a complicated issue and not everybody out there is a gio physics professor, so could you explain for us how does pudge thing water in to the ground create an earthquake? >> several ways but the primary is the water weeks in the fault zones and weakens the strength that is the rocks and act as an effective lubricant so the faults which are held together by friction suddenly get greased and lip urged forces there already. >> you said you are suspicious
sets - the running rebels during the 1999 season. led by larry johnson. wich eta has a game on saturday. they are loving life. >> i told the team no team has gone in the regular season. in all the years of college basketball. that's how up do that. all the teams and the unlb teams. it's a first. we didn't play our best, but i'm pleased with the win. >> as for the number one team - florida having issues, but downed the stretch the the gaiters manned up. >> dorian finley smith scoring a game-high. gaiters winning 57-54 to climp a chair of the scc title. raymond felton is in trouble, posting bail after being arrested on two felon gun charges. felton could play thursday night because according to the bargaining agreement, the nicks are not allowed to suspend a player because he's been arrested. he was arrested for being in possession with an unregistered gun, after getting into a dispute with his estranged life. >> arizona lost the super bowl in 1993 because the state failed to register martin luther king state as a holiday. they are in danger of losing the super bowl. the governor consider
older seniors is a way to fill up the time. larry davis and dwight shank are making morning rounds. >> how are you? >> how are you. >> nice to meet you. >> today's task - bridging the snow tyres up from the basement and catching up with friends. >> it's not often, but it's when we need it. that's when we call for help. >> bobby is retired. >> do you plan much. >> by the time we are in our 80s. we were beginning to need help. >> bobby is giving her husband cooking lessons, just in case. >> i never liked cooking. i'm not good at it. bobby takes special efforts to keep me learning how to cook. so if i'm alone or if she's in the hospital for a long time, a nursing home, i don't like the said of living alone. >> she won't be alone. for all the benefits there are draw backs. >> i was involved with a member on a whole variety of things. i was working with her on her computer, on her exercise machine, and sometimes we would just chat for a bit. i enjoyed her and she had a sudden death. that hit me as hard as anything recently aside from my own family members. >> it's not part of the job de
Search Results 0 to 15 of about 16 (some duplicates have been removed)

Terms of Use (10 Mar 2001)